ARRANGING ADULT CARE

Care and support

"I want to find out how to get the help and support I need."

Types of care and support

Do you want to continue to live at home?

We know it’s important to keep your independence and stay living in your own home for as long as possible.

We’ve put together some great advice, along with details of many services and support groups that can help you with this.

If you need practical, financial and/or emotional support to help you with your care needs, there are a number of care options available to you.

Home care

Home care, also known as domiciliary care, describes care services that would enable you to continue living in your own home.

This type of care is usually provided by care workers or nurses. They can help you with a range of tasks.

Personal tasks

Home care workers can help you with personal tasks, such as:

  • getting in and out of bed
  • using the shower or taking a bath
  • get dressed or brushing your hair
  • using the toilet and/or using continence aids
  • preparing meals and drinks
  • eating and drinking
  • anything you need to do related to your health, including administering medication
  • any nursing care you may need.

Practical tasks

Home care workers can help you with practical tasks, such as:

  • doing your weekly shop, or popping to the local shop for essentials
  • managing your money, such as collecting your pension or making sure your bills are paid
  • collecting your prescriptions
  • doing your washing and ironing
  • keeping your home clean.

Social needs

Home care workers can also provide companionship, offering you a chance to chat with someone over a cuppa.

They can also help you to get out of the house and meet up with friends, or attend an activity or fitness group.

To help you to stay independent

There are many services and support groups that are dedicated to helping you stay independent, happy and healthy.

Take a look at some of the useful information on this website:

Respite care

A respite stay, or short break is a planned stay in a residential care home. It is usually for a period of 1 to 2 weeks, but can be up to 8 weeks.

There are many reasons why you may need to stay in a care home for a short period, such as:

  • your carer is temporarily unable to look after you as they are on holiday or out of town
  • your carer may need extra support - perhaps after feeling unwell
  • you need help to recover from an illness or operation - perhaps you are in hospital and ready to leave but not ready to live on your own
  • you’re considering moving into a care home permanently, and would like a trial visit
  • you're feeling lonely and may benefit from spending some time with other people.

Are you a carer looking for respite break options?

Take a look at breaks for carers that has a variety of options for arranging care, together with potential places for you to take a short break.

Shared lives

If you have a learning disability, mental health problem or any other needs that make it hard for you to live on your own, living or spending a few nights with a shared lives carer in their own home could be a good option for you.

Sheltered or supported housing

Sheltered housing and supported housing is the name given to a group of self-contained flats or bungalows - normally with 1 or 2 bedrooms. This type of housing can suit you if you want to live:

  • independently in a private residence but need a bit more support
  • in a small, easier to manage home.

These housing complexes, sometimes referred to as housing schemes, often have a range of communal facilities including a:

  • garden
  • lounge
  • laundry room
  • 2-way personal alarm system for on-call support all day, every day.

Many properties also have a part-time on-site manager available for advice and assistance.

How to apply

To live in sheltered or supported housing, you’ll need to qualify to receive care and support from us. You must also be on the council waiting list before you can apply. Find out more about sheltered or supported housing on the East Riding of Yorkshire Council website.

Extra care housing

Extra care housing is made up of self-contained apartments designed to enable people with a care need to live independently.

Residents also benefit from on-site support available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

How to apply

To live in extra care housing, you’ll need to qualify to receive care and support from us. You must also be on the council waiting list before you can apply. Find out more about extra care housing on the East Riding of Yorkshire Council website.

Care homes

You may need to consider moving into a care home if you:

  • are struggling to live alone, even with extra help and home adaptations
  • need more help than sheltered housing or extra care housing can provide
  • have had a needs assessment that has suggested a care home is the best option
  • have a complex medical condition that needs attention during the day and night.
  • As a local authority we run a number of care homes within the East Riding, but there are also homes run by private companies and voluntary or charity organisations.

As a local authority we run a number of care homes within East Riding, but there are also homes run by private companies and voluntary or charity organisations.

Making the decision to move into a care home is a major decision. It is important to make sure you find a care home that can not only cater to your care needs, but allows you to continue doing all the things that are important to you.

Choosing the right care home

If you have decided to move into a care home, it is important that you research your options. Make sure you find a care home that can not only cater to your care needs, but allows you to continue doing all the things that are important to you. These sites have some information that may help you to decide:

End of life care

End of life care is support for people who are in the last weeks, months or years of their life. It should help you to live as well as possible until you die, and allow you to die with dignity. The people providing your care should ask you about your wishes and preferences, and take these into account as they work with you to plan your care. They should also support your family, carers or other people who are important to you.

Hospice care

Hospices that provide care for people from the point at which their illness is diagnosed as terminal to the end of their life, however long that may be.

There are 2 local hospices who treat East Riding residents, but you can choose where you receive care, for example:

  • at home
  • within a care home
  • as an in-patient at the hospice
  • as a day patient visiting the hospice.

Hospice teams include doctors, nurses, social workers, therapists, counsellors and trained volunteers. You can read more about hospice care on the NHS website.